Our Vision

We believe in ourselves, we are professional and do what we say we will do.

Our Mission

We strive to add value to our customers to our company and to our profession.

Our Values

We work as a team to provide Quick response with Friendly and supportive team and low cost service to make our customers happy.

Our Values

We respect our customers and each other and conduct with fairness and integrity.

Our Values

We honor what we do, value friendship and family, celebrate success and have fun

Tuesday, January 7, 2014

Job interview - reducing anxiety

 
Many of us find job interviews to be anxiety inducing events. For some, this is a real problem as it creates nervousness, the interviewee can stammer through the answers, and get so worked up that they quite simply fail the interview (even before they have started). If you have a job interview coming up, there are many tools to use that will help put your mind at ease, and keep you focused.

Prepare and take notes in with you

Those who take a file and interview notes with them into interview will benefit from an increased feeling of confidence. Remember, taking notes into an interview isn't frowned upon - it's a smart way of preparing for a meeting. Having notes will give you an instant boast of confidence, a support mechanism, and will also ensure that you are much better equipped for each stage of the interview.

Prepare for the interview

Complete research into the company, its market, competitors and what the job you are applying for entails. Try to obtain a full job description from the recruiting manager prior to the interview. Prepare your file one or two days before the interview (giving yourself plenty of time). Ensure you include a copy of your resume, job description, supporting documentation and notes. Know that you will need to sell you skills, and ensure you have these skills noted mentally or physically on paper. Remember, the more preparation you do, the more confident and calm you will be on the day.

Try to relax, it's only an interview

An interview is merely a way for two people to determine if they will be a good match for each other, and the job interview is just a sharing of information. It's also as much about you interviewing them, as it is about them interviewing you. Try not to lose site of this point.

It's so important that you don't worry about your personality, and how you are coming across. Stick to you interview plan and interview notes.


Tips Tricks to reduce physical and emotional stress

  • Practice simple breathing techniques;
  • If possible, undertake 30 minutes worth of excercise in the morning (but no less than 2 hours before the interview);
  • Listen to relaxing music and calm yourself;
  • Do not smoke or drink caffeine for at least 2 hours before;
  • Make constructive conversation with friends;
  • If you feel yourself getting tense in the interview, be conscious of this and try to relax your shoulders.

And finally...

Try to learn from each interview. Ask for feedback and try to adjust your style to suit a wider audience. If you still feel interview nerves is a weakness, then try to seek professional help from a trained advisor. It will be money well spent.

Job Interview Tips - What Not to Say in a Job Interview

 
Interviewing for any job can create stress, and for some, can result in a lack of good judgment when it comes to what to talk about. Many interviewees with good intentions, can end up saying things that are inappropriate or inaccurate, which ultimately costs them the job.  

  • Do not speak negatively about your past employer or organisation. If asked why you are leaving or why you left, simply say that you are looking for a new opportunity. Talking badly about your former boss, company or co-workers will come across as negative.

  • If you are uncomfortable about providing private and /or sensitive information about your current employer (such as financials), avoid a negative response by saying “I’m not sure my company would like me to disclose that information". Ideally, if talking about financials, you can use a range instead of exact amounts. For example, company turnover being $35Mil, then you can provide a range of "$30Mil to $40Mil". This is a more helpful strategy.
  • Avoid discussing salary until the interviewer brings it up. Typically, this will come up after you have been offered the position, or at the end of the interview. Immediately asking “How much will I get paid?” or asking "When is the next pay rise" could have the interviewer believing that money is a number one factor.

  • Do not say anything that is not true about your past work history. The interviewer will most likely cross reference your past jobs,so you will eventually get caught out and lose the job. Always be honest about your experiences, history and abilities. If the interviewer asks why you were fired from a job, be forthcoming but explain how you have learned from the mistake. Never lie and say that you left of your own accord, if indeed you were released.

  • Do not interrupt the interviewer. Always let them lead the conversation and set the pace of  the interview. If you interrupt or try to lead, you will come across as pushy and someone who doesn't demonstrate good listening skills. Stop yourself from over talking!

  •  In an interview, you want to remain professional, yet friendly. But don't get too friendly and share too many details. Keep your answers simple, concise and to the point so that you avoid babbling on unnecessarily and giving away personal information. Always remember, this is an interview!

Job interview - Questions to Ask



It's important to ask questions in an interview. These should be questions to clarify job specifics through to key points of interest which will enable you to determine whether this is the right job, employer and culture fit for you.



  • What are the most important skills and characteristics your
  • What made you decide to join the company? (providing they don't own the business!)
  • What has been the pattern of growth for the company over the past 5 years
  • What is the future growth plan of the company?
  • Why is this job open?
  • How many people held this position over the recent years?
  • How does this position fit into the overall organisation?
  • Who will I be reporting to
  • Where is the job located by way of company structure?
  • What type of training is required for this position? How long is the training period?
  • What other training opportunities are provided?
  • Where are the greatest opportunities for growth within the company?
  • Who are the company's major competitors?
  • Who are your major customers? Are they mostly local, regional or global
  • What will my priorities be? What will be my first assignment?
  • What issues/challenges am I likely to face when I first take on the role?



Remember: write some questions down before interview and during the interview. Don't try to leave everything to memory. It's also down to you to have the confidence to ask the questions, and to ask question that you feel will be relevant in helping you make your decision. It's a two way process where both you and the interviewer need to know more.

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