Our Vision

To give customers the most compelling IT Support experience possible.

Our Mission

Our mission is simple: make technology an asset for your business not a problem.

Our Values

We strive to make technology integrate seamlessly with your business so your business can grow. As your technology partner, when your business grows ours will grow with you, therefore, we will work hand in hand with you to support your growth.

Our Values

We develop relationship that makes a positive difference in our customers Business.

Our Values

We exibit a strong will to win in the marketplace and in every aspect of our Business

Problem solving tips for helpdesk personnel


Working on a help desk is all about problem solving. Users have problems and look to us for a solution. 

We all know that there are some people who are very good at solving problems and there are those who sometimes struggle. The good ones aren't necessarily more technical, they just have an almost uncanny ability to solve problems which have everyone else stumped.
 
If you are one of those that sometimes struggle, don't worry, it is possible to improve by following some very simple guidelines which we will show you on this site.

On this site we will take you through some of the key steps. The examples are all based on a IT help desk but the principles are universal. 

We present this guide in the form of several numbered steps. This doesn't mean to say that problem solving is a linear process, very often you will need to loop back to an earlier stage.

The Symptoms: It is vital you identify the symptoms. Quite often a user will call with "My computer is not working", but we all know how useless that is ! Here are some questions that are applicable to practically all problems:

1. What is the exact error message?
This maybe obvious, but sometimes it is easy to jump to conclusions based on partial information. If possible, get the user to send you a screen dump (hold down the ALT button, then press the PrtScr buttons, go to e.g. Word, create a new document and select Paste from the Edit menu)

2. What were you doing at the time?
By determining this you can identify which program or which part of the program is causing the problem.

3. Has the error always occurred or just started?
If the program has never worked, then it is possibly a fault with program. If it used to work OK, then you will need to find out at what point in time it stopped working.

4. If it has just started, have you recently installed any other software or made any other changes?
People are very reluctant to admit they have made changes - perhaps they are worried they will get into trouble? So, you will generally find that the answer to this question is "No", but never believe it. The program was working, now it isn't - something must have changed. Bear in mind that the user might not be aware of changes (e.g. many programs and even the operating system may do automatic updates) or they might not realize the significance of some apparently unrelated change.

5. Does it affect all machines or just yours?
If there are other machines that can use the program without problem, then the fault obviously lies with the configuration of this individual's machine.
If every machine has the same problem, it might be that they all have the same configuration problem or it might be a problem with the application's data.

6. In the case of networked programs. if you use the program from a different machine, do you get the same error?
If the error does not appear when you use the same application program from a different machine, then it is likely to be a fault in the configuration of the user's machine.
 

Examine the Evidence

What evidence is relevant? Do you have enough evidence? These are two key questions when problem solving but you aren't going to know the answers to them until you start postulate possible causes and want to test them further.

Experience may sometimes tell you that certain facts are irrelevant. This is good, and will help you concentrate on what you think is relevant, BUT, don't forget about them and keep an open mind.
Your biggest tool for gathering evidence is of course your question and answer sessions with the user, but there are other tools which you can use:

Filemon is a great utility which logs all file activity. Set it running, the go to the problem program and generate the error. Stop Filemmon and look at the log. It generates a great deal of information but it is very easy to see problems.

Event logs: Most operating systems have both application and event logs. Check these to see if anything is relevant.

Confirm everything:  Quite often you have to tease the information out of a user over several question and answer situations. Once you feel that you understand the problem, make sure you confirm it with the user :

"So, as I understand it, if you clck the Update button while creating a new record, the screen crashes with an error "Record must be unique". This was working fine on Friday, no-one else has this problem, and you haven't made any changes to your machine over the weekend. Is that correct?"
If they don't confirm then you must repeat step 1 until you are both happy that you are talking about the same problem.

Research: You know what the symptoms are, you know in what circumstances they appear, now you have to start finding a solution.

Of course, it might be that someone has already done the hard work for you - others may have had, and solved, this problem. There are several sources of information you might try:

Knowledge base : Somewhere, you should have a record of all past problems (and their solutions), otherwise you are going to keep wasting an awful lot of time. This should be in a form that is easily searched. You could use e.g. a spreadsheet, a simple document, a database, or a program designed specifically for the task. As long as it is easy to use.

The Internet : The Internet is a fantastic resource. The only problem is the sheer volume of information. A good search engine is key to getting the best of it. You can almost guarantee that someone, somewhere has had the same problem as your user and if you are lucky, there might be an answer already.

Colleagues: You might try asking your workmates, they may have seen this problem before. Of course, this will disrupt their work so it is not the most efficient use of resources and they will soon get tired of you if you make it a habit. This should only be used as a last resort.

Postulate and test:  By now, you know what the symptoms are and you have done some research on similar problems. You should by now have some theories as to the cause of the problem.

Now you need to test your theories. This usually involves further questioning of the user:
"Your monitor is blank; can you check if there is a green light on the front, bottom right of the monitor?"
 
If there is, then you know there is power to the monitor, but is there a signal?
"Do you have another monitor nearby that you can plug in instead?"
 
If the new monitor works, then it is a problem with the old one. If the problem persists, chase it back up the wire...
"Can you put the original monitor onto a different machine? Does it work Ok there?"
 
If it does, the the fault is with the original PC.
"Is there a green light on the front right of the PC?"
 
If there is, the problem is probably with the PC itself.

Don't assume or jump to conclusions. Take a step by step approach, eliminating possibilities as you go. Sometimes when there are many possible answers you are able to narrow the field considerably by taking an initial broad brush approach. In the above example the first question we asked was "...can you check if there is a green light ...". If the answer was no, then either the monitor wasn't plugged in or there was a power failure. Perhaps a better first question would be "Plug a desk lamp into the same socket - does it work?"

Keep an open mind. You might find yourself going right down one avenue of investigation only to come to a full stop. Don't forget your other theories, go back and test these as well.

Identify the Problem

You know what the symptoms are, you have confirmed everything with the user, had one or more ideas as to the problem and now you have narrowed it down to just one. You must double-check that this you have identified it correctly. There is no point in telling your user to buy a new monitor if all they have to do is wait for the power failure to be restored!
In the ideal world you will be able to devise one test that identifies the problem without doubt.
Of course, in the real world, all you can do is take your best guess, try your solution and hope. The mark of a good support person is how accurate that "guess" is. If you have followed the steps so far, gathered enough evidence, confirmed everything with the user and eliminated other possibilities logically, then your "guess" should be pretty accurate.

Provide a Solution:  This is what the user expects you to do, right? After all, you know what the problem is so fix it.

Most of the time you might have an easy solution. Other times there might not be an immediate fix available - you might need to order a spare part or it might require a new software release. There are even those situations where you don't know what the problem is. In any case, you need to communicate and manage expectations.
 
·         If you have a solution, communicate the fix to the user clearly and ensure they understand.
·         If you don't have an immediate solution, again make sure the user understands this and the likely timeframes. Make sure you schedule an action for yourself to monitor this.
·         If you don't have any solution to the problem, do you have a work-around 

Confirm the Solution: You have told the user how to fix their problem, or you have arranged someone to do it for them. After the fix has gone in, you must confirm with the user that their problem has been solved. You can't assume that the engineer visited, or that the new part worked.
Keep in touch with the user until you know the problem has been resolved.

Communicate and Record : The worst thing for a user is if they believe their problem is not being given attention. They don't care that you have dozens of other users to deal with. That isn't (and shouldn't be) their concern. 

You must manage expectations, if you say "I'll get back to you", their idea of when you should do so might be very different to yours. Instead, say "I'll get back to you before 12:00 tomorrow" and make sure you do, even if it is to tell them that there has been no progress.

Record everything. No one has a perfect memory and no one only ever deals with one thing at a time. You must make a note of conversations, actions, agreements etc.
·         You can easily hand tasks over to other personnel
·         You rarely work on one problem to the exclusion of others until it is completed. So you will be switching back and forth and will need some sort of reminder as to what has happened beforehand.
·         You will build up a knowledge base of problems and solutions for use in the future.
·         If there are recriminations, you have a record of what was done!
In what form you record this is up to you. You could use a document, a simple database, write your own program or use software specifically designed for use by helpdesks.

Sample Ticket Template #01
Which application is the user having issues with?
 - Please include the URL if it is a Web application.
 OR - Please include the folder path if it's a file.
---------------
What is the Incident?  What is the User Experiencing?
/-Type description
What is the Error Message?
Capture message number or description
When did this problem happen?
---------------
What is the Impact to the Business/User?
---------------How many users affected by this one or more / is it happening across the organization?
How urgent is the resolution of this incident?
 (Delete as necessary)
 COB today/ 1 day/ 2 days/ End of week
---------------
Do you have a work around?  Is there any other work you can do, can you use someone else's PC?  Is there another means by which you can get the required task completed?
---------------
What is the name of the users machine? *
 - Shadow user's machine to get this information
Ask user to open command prompt then type hostname
---------------
What is the IP address of the users machine? *
 - Shadow user's machine to get this information
Or Ask user to open command prompt then type ipconfig [windows]/ifconfig [linux]
 Please attach a screenshot of the error
 - Shadow user's machine to get full screenshot
Or ask user to take screen shot and email it to you.

Sample Communication Template #01
Hello 

As a standard procedure, we require approval from your manager so we can fulfill your request.
Please provide this at your earliest convenience (via email if possible).

Thank you
ICT Service Desk Team

Sample Communication Template #02
 
ICT Service Desk Call Back No Response: #01
Dear [         ],

We have attempted to contact you on 1 occasion to resolve your service request, however we have been unsuccessful. 

If you still require assistance for this request, please contact the Service Desk on 00 0000 0000.

Regards
ICT Service Desk Team

CISCO CCNA Cyber Ops Certification




Another achievement for the love of #Cyber #Security completed two exam to become Cisco Certified Network Associate Cyber Ops (CCNA Cyber Ops) Thanks to my family, work colleague and my networks for encouragement and support. #CCNA #CyberOps #CyberSecurity 

My review for the Cert: This cert is for security analyst interested in Security Operation Center to become CISCO Cyber Ops it required to pass two exam.

First one is like knowing networking , cryptography , general info sec concepts, web attack, linux and windows commands, file system, logs and different type of model that deal with threat.
Second exam is implementing like type of Security operations monitoring tools, incident detection,analysis and playbooks, threat hunting, Threat scoring, incident response and automation, Computer Forensics, Network Intrusion Analysis, Data and event analysis etc
Loved studying the CISCO books but felt amazing when setup LAB in my pc Three VM First is vulnerable linux pc (metasploitable vm) Second for Monitoring (Security Onion ) Linux which have monitoring tools included and Third for Hacking/Breaking the other vulnerable system using (KALI Linux) which have industry standard awesome tools included. Also love  reading Computer Security Incident Handling Guide: NIST 800-61 doc.


CCNA Cyber Ops Exam Details :
https://learningnetwork.cisco.com/community/certifications/ccna-cyber-ops

Study Material for first Exam: SECFND Study Material
Understanding Cisco Cybersecurity Fundamentals (SECFND) v1.0
https://learningnetwork.cisco.com/community/certifications/ccna-cyber-ops/secfnd/study-material


Study Material for Second Exam: SECOPS Study Material
Implementing Cisco Cybersecurity Operations (SECOPS) v1.0
https://learningnetwork.cisco.com/community/certifications/ccna-cyber-ops/secops/study-material

Password what to use and how to use it ?


Now a days Passwords for people is like we don't love them but can't live without them. So, here is something that help you to stay secure. I am sure that you know many of the following widely available and well-known guidelines for creating more secure passwords, but just in case, here is a recap:
  1. Use a mix upper- and lowercase letters, numbers, and special characters for example, Th1$1$@Samp!3
  2. Replace some letters with numbers (for example, replace i with 1 and e with 3)
  3. Do not include your name or other personal information (such as spouse /children, street address, school, birthdays, and anniversaries).
  4. Use nonsense phrases, misspellings, substitutions, or before-and-after words and phrases combining two unrelated words or phrases, such as “Avangers007” "Highway2R@bbitH0le" "TheE4gl3hasALandD0wnUnder"
  5. Combine two words by using a special character for example, P1zza&Cok3 Tra1n@ndT1ck3t, H4rry!P0t3r.
  6. Use a combination of all the other tips in this list for example, “Harry porter becomes H4rry!P0t3r, Pizza and coke becomes P1zza&Cok3 etc.
  7. Do not use repeating patterns between changes for example, password1, password2, password3, Most importantly 123456789 should never be used as password.
  8. Do not use the same passwords for work and personal accounts.
  9. Do not use passwords that are too difficult to remember.(keep it 8-14 character)
  10. Use a password manager like KeePass Password Safe, LastPass, Dashlane, Sticky Password, Roboform, TrueKey, Symantec Norton Identity Safe etc
Finally “A password should be like a toothbrush. Use it every day; change it regularly; and DON’T share it with friends.”


Faysal Hasan - is a IT System Engineer with a passion for security. He worked in information technology service delivery for more than 7 years. He received his Bachelor in IT from Southern Cross University, Australia and has earned numerous technical certifications throughout his career which include MCSE, 2xMCSA, CCNA Cyber Ops, VMWare Data Center, Citrix Xen App, Mcafee Endpoint Protection, ITIL v3,. He  also received many training that include SPLUNK, Service NOW, Prince 2 project management etc, He  is currently working as System Engineer in Enterprise Operations looking after technology infrastructure for Victoria Police.

Be Ready When Someone Asks, “What Do You Do?”

I really like the 60-Second Solutions videos on Entrepreneur.com. I thought that the recent video by communications coach Carmine Gallo on creating a 60 second strategy to tell your story was especially useful.

Sometimes it’s hard to explain to people what it is you really do. Many people hear the word ‘freelancer’ and don’t quite understand what it means, other than you probably work from home in your pajamas.

Gallo suggests you come up with one sentence answers to the following four questions to keep your “What I Do” story to 60 seconds.

Are you a graphic designer? A freelancer writer or photographer? Do you have a niche or topic (like small business, agriculture, health) that you concentrate on? Turn this into one sentence. Example: I am a freelance blogger and I write about small business financing for several online magazines.
If you don’t solve a problem…then why do you exist? Maybe you are a wedding photographer and work with couples to capture their big day. Maybe you have an MBA and share small business advice for newspapers and websites. Maybe you create logos to help companies better brand themselves. Whatever you do—put it in the context of how your services solve a problem. Example:
I help small businesses create and implement a social media marketing plan.
Competition is everywhere, and you need to know what makes you better than the next guy that does the same thing you do. Why do you prefer to shop at Home Depot rather than Lowes? Target rather than Walmart? Pat’s Pizza rather than Jason’s Pizza?

Is their customer service better? Prices better? Does their pizza delivery guy show up faster? Use your talents and experience to tout yourself. Example:
I have an MFA in graphic design and stay up to date with the latest trends and technology by attending professional development workshops twice a year.
Tell people how you are going to make their life easier. Maybe you are a whiz at creating compelling websites and will take the time to teach your clients how to manage them on their own. Maybe you have contacts in the media and can help promote your clients news and events effectively through press releases and social media marketing. Maybe you know of a way to help your client’s business run more efficiently, saving them money in the long run. Example:
I have a database of media contacts throughout the state and can help you promote your annual fundraiser by creating press releases and writing stories for the local newspapers.
Once you get these sentences down, practice them in front of a mirror. Then head out to a networking event and try them out. Someone might not ask you all four questions at the same time, but it’s still good to have a response ready and waiting.

By keeping your answers to one sentence, you keep from rambling on about yourself. Being succinct shows that you really know your business and are comfortable and confident talking about whatever it is that you have built your freelancing career on doing. Don’t be afraid to ask other people the same four questions—see if their responses are as good as yours!

Adobe Elements, Adobe Acrobat Reader, "Attempt to access invalid address" in Windows 10, Windows 7



Adobe Elements, Adobe Acrobat Reader, error message "attempt to access invalid address  in Windows 10, Windows 7


Try this Reg fix 

The key is "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager\Memory Management" 

Look for entry MoveImages 
if not there create new DWORD and it will be hexadecimal value 0x0 by default
If you set the key to 1 instead of 0 and restart your machine it resolved this error message


For Office 365 Attempt to access invalid address

The issue is for EMET (Enhanced Mitigation Experience Toolkit) which  causing the problems.
Try upgrading to new version from here https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/security/jj653751
or uninstalling EMET doesn't work 
Then try this reg fix :

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Image File Execution Options\
For any process used by MS product it will have a value for 'MitigationOption' (eg excel.exe, infopath.exe etc) 

Set 'MitigationOption' to 0 or delete it.

Google Apps for your small business

I've been using Google Apps for my company, and it's really helped my team work more quickly and efficiently. I think that you'd also benefit from trying it out for your business.

Google Apps is a cloud-based productivity suite that includes Gmail for professional email, Drive for online storage, Hangouts for video meetings, Calendar for scheduling and Docs for editing files. 

I especially like how easy it is to get things done and work with others from anywhere, using any device that I choose. I've also found Apps to be highly cost effective.

Google Apps helps teams communicate, collaborate and get things done from anywhere and on any device. It's simple to set up, use and manage, so your business can focus on what really matters.

Millions of organisations around the world count on Google Apps for professional email, file storage, video meetings, online calendars, document editing and more.

These are some highlights:
Business email for your domain:

Looking professional matters, and that means communicating as you@yourcompany.com. Gmail’s simple, powerful features help you build your brand while getting more done.

Access from any location or device:
Check emails, share files, edit documents, hold video meetings and more, whether you’re at work, at home or in transit. You can pick up where you left off from a computer, tablet or phone.

Enterprise-level management tools:
Robust admin settings give you total command over users, devices, security and more. Your data always belongs to you, and it goes with you, if you switch solutions.

Start free trial

Faysal Hasan - is a IT System Engineer has with a passion for security. He worked in information technology service delivery for more than 7 years. He received his Bachelor in IT from Southern Cross University, Australia and has earned numerous technical certifications throughout his career. He is currently working as the System Engineer in Enterprise Operations looking after technology infrastructure for Victoria Police.

Windows 10 Change your Default Browser

Change Your Default Browser
If you upgraded to Windows 10 from Windows 7 or 8, you'll notice that Microsoft Edge is now your default browser, even if Chrome or Firefox was your default before. Edge Browser is a bit faster than Chrome or Firefox, but doesn't provide the level of extensibility that its competitors offer. If you are a Chrome or Firefox user, you'll want to change your default right away.
1. Navigate to settings.

2. Click System.



  
3. Select Default apps from the left pane.
                    
4. Click the Microsoft Edge icon under the "Web browser" header.
 

5. Select the browser you want as your new default (ex: Chrome).

Windows 10 how to Disable User Account Control

Isn't it annoying every time you try to remove or install something windows ask for your account username and password or at least you have to press yes now you get say goodbye to User account control pop up. Here is how to Disable User Account Control










Windows wants to wag a finger at you every time you try to install a program or change a vital setting by popping up a dialog box and making you click Ok to continue. Why warn  you if you already know what you're doing? Good question. Disable User Account control to stop the needless, annoying dialog boxes.
1. Search for "user account control" in the search box.
2. Open "Change User Account Control settings."
3. Slide the slider down to "Never notify" and click Ok.
4. Click Yes when prompted.

Windows 10 how to Enable System Protection / Create a Restore Point

Enable System Protection / Create a Restore Point
What happens if you install a bad piece of software or a defective driver and your computer starts acting strangely or you can't even boot. You'll want to revert Windows 10 to the previous system restore point, which will turn back the clock on your drivers, programs and settings to a time when the system worked perfectly. However, Windows 10 comes with system protection disabled. If you want to protect yourself -- and you should -- set up restore points following the instructions below.
1. Search for "restore point" in the Windows search box.


2. Launch "Create a restore point" from the results. You should see a list of available drives.
3. Select the system drive and click Configure. The system drive is usually the C: drive and has the word "(System)" written after its volume name.
4. Toggle Restore Settings to "Turn on system protection," set the maximum disk space usage by moving the slider and click Ok. We recommend leaving 2 or 3 percent for restore pints but you may be able to get away with the lowest (1 percent).
5. Click Create so that you create an initial restore point right away.
6. Name the initial restore point when prompted.
 7. Click Close when it is done.
If you need to restore from one of these points, you can click the System Restore button on the System Protection tab. If you can't boot, you can hit F8 or Shift + F8 during boot to get to the emergency menu on some computers. On other PCs, if you can at least get to the log in screen, you can hold down Shift while you select Restart.


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