What is Phishing and key points to remember

What is phishing

Phishing is a type of online scam in which attackers send fraudulent emails or create fake websites with the intention of tricking individuals into divulging sensitive information such as login credentials, credit card numbers, and other financial information. The attackers often pose as trusted organizations or individuals and use various tactics to persuade the victim to click on a link or download an attachment. The link or attachment may contain malware that can infect the victim's device or redirect the victim to a fake website where they are prompted to enter their personal information.


Phishing attacks can be difficult to recognize because the attackers go to great lengths to make their emails and websites look legitimate. To protect against phishing attacks, it is important to be cautious when clicking on links or downloading attachments in emails, and to verify the authenticity of the sender and the website before entering any personal information. It is also a good idea to use a secure web browser and to keep your antivirus software up to date.


What is smishing


Smishing is a type of social engineering attack that involves the use of SMS text messages to trick individuals into divulging sensitive information or clicking on malicious links. Smishing attacks often target mobile phone users and can be used to steal personal information such as login credentials, credit card numbers, and other financial information. Smishers use a variety of tactics to lure victims into falling for their scams, including posing as trusted organizations or individuals, creating a sense of urgency or fear, and offering incentives or rewards. To protect against smishing attacks, it is important to be cautious when receiving text messages from unknown numbers and to verify the authenticity of the message before clicking on any links or providing personal information.


Different type of phishing and their defination


There are several different types of phishing attacks, including:


Spear phishing: This type of phishing attack is targeted at a specific individual or organization and often involves the attacker posing as someone the victim knows or trusts.


Whaling: Similar to spear phishing, but the target is a high-level executive or someone with significant influence within an organization.


Clone phishing: This type of attack involves the attacker sending a legitimate email or creating a fake website that is a copy of a legitimate one, but with a malicious link or attachment.


Vishing: This type of attack involves the use of voice calls or voicemails to trick victims into divulging sensitive information.


Impersonation attacks: These attacks involve the attacker pretending to be someone else, such as a colleague or a customer service representative, in order to obtain sensitive information.


CEO fraud: Also known as "business email compromise," this type of attack involves the attacker pretending to be the CEO or another high-level executive and requesting sensitive information or money from an employee.


Some key points to remember about phishing:

  1. Be wary of unexpected or suspicious emails, especially those that contain links or attachments.
  2. Do not click on links or download attachments from unfamiliar or untrusted sources.
  3. Be cautious when providing personal or financial information online, especially in response to an email or unsolicited request.
  4. Pay attention to the website's address, or URL, before entering sensitive information. Make sure it begins with "https" and has a lock icon, indicating that it is a secure site.
  5. Use anti-virus and anti-malware software and keep it up-to-date.
  6. Use strong and unique passwords for all of your accounts, and enable two-factor authentication if it is available.
  7. Keep your operating system and other software up-to-date with the latest security patches.
  8. Be aware of phishing attacks that use phone calls or text messages as well as email. Do not provide personal or financial information in response to unsolicited phone calls or text messages.

Remember, if something seems too good to be true or seems suspicious, it is always better to err on the side of caution and not click on links or download attachments from unfamiliar or untrusted sources.

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