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To give customers the most compelling IT Support experience possible.

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Our mission is simple: make technology an asset for your business not a problem.

Our Values

We strive to make technology integrate seamlessly with your business so your business can grow. As your technology partner, when your business grows ours will grow with you, therefore, we will work hand in hand with you to support your growth.

Our Values

We develop relationship that makes a positive difference in our customers Business.

Our Values

We exibit a strong will to win in the marketplace and in every aspect of our Business

Saturday, August 22, 2020

ATO Scam Alert

 🚨 SCAM ALERT 🚨 Be on the lookout for a new phone #scam claiming your #tax file number (TFN) has been suspended!


Recorded phone calls claiming to be from the #ATO and other government agencies are trying to trick people into providing personal information. These scammers will tell you there’s a legal case against you, and if you don’t follow instructions and provide the information requested, you’ll be arrested.

⚠️ Don’t follow the prompts, and don’t provide the information requested. We will never send unsolicited pre-recorded messages to your phone, or threaten you with immediate arrest. If you’re ever unsure whether an #ATO interaction is genuine, hang up and phone our scam hotline on 1800 008 540. Warn your family and friends to stay alert and visit scam alerts page to learn more:



Phishing and spear-phishing method of stealing confidential information

 In the recent Stay Smart Online, Alert email advise that there is a significant increase in the past few months of COVID themed phishing scams, using all sorts of lures to try and trick people into handing over personal details.


#Phishing and spear-phishing is a method of stealing confidential information by sending fraudulent messages to a victim, through email or message platforms. They remain among the MOST common method used by malicious #cyber actors to target Australians.

Since the #pandemic's outbreak, the Government’s #Scamwatch has received over 3,060 coronaviruses themed scam reports with over $1,371,000 in reported losses.

#Phishing campaigns can be sent via email, SMS, social media, instant messenger or a phone call. They can look extremely convincing, often imitating legitimate messages from trusted senders in government or business.

See attached are an example of #scam #email that I usually get in my (test) mailbox. Look at the subjects all trying to attract you in a way to click a link or provide details. Especially now Corona and Tax return season they are more active than before.

Hope this helps to Stay safe and on alert don't lose your money or info to the scammers.

Beware of COVID style scam

 Beware of COVID style scam. This is phone scam but COVID email, app, and web scam also present which I have shared previously


It goes like this
Scammer: Good morning, According to our system, you are likely to have been in close proximity to someone who has tested positive for COVID-19. This means that you now need to self-isolate for 14 days and take a COVID-19 test.

'OK. Can you tell me who that person was?'

Scam : 'I'm not able to tell you that. That is confidential information.

Right. Um... so ....

Scam : But you do need to be tested within the next 72 hours. So can I just get the best mailing address so that we can send a kit to you?'

Ok (gives address)

Scam : Thank you - and I just need to take a payment card so that we can finalize this and send the kit to you.'

Sorry - a payment card? I thought this was all free?' - RED ALART here people

Scam : No - I'm afraid not. There is a one-off fee of $50 for the kit and test results. Could you read off the long card number for me, please, when you're ready.'

No - that's not right

Scam: I'm afraid it is. Can you give me the card number please - this is very important, and there are penalties for not complying.'

You should Put the phone down.

This is how #scammers work. And vulnerable people will fall for it.

Monday, December 9, 2019

Commonwealth Bank SCAM Alert

SCAM ALERT:
Watch out for this phishing scam from 'Commbonk'. The scam starts as an email using various display names, each containing the word ‘CommBank’. Unsuspecting recipients who click on the link to view ‘transaction details’ are each led to a different page which redirects to a page using the domain 'commbonk'. According the security company, MailGuard, this is a phishing page masquerading as a fake Commonwealth Bank sign-in page. Don't click on the link and delete email immediately. . The scam starts as an email using various display names, each containing the word ‘CommBank’. Unsuspecting recipients who click on the link to view ‘transaction details’ are each led to a different page which redirects to a page using the domain 'commbonk'. According the security company, MailGuard, this is a phishing page masquerading as a fake Commonwealth Bank sign-in page. Don't click on the link and delete email immediately. .
  • use of a major brand name to inspire false trust; the usage of the supposed ‘Commonwealth’ display name boosts the email's credibility,
  • inclusion of ‘Helplines’ typically expected of a well-established bank such as bank support numbers for local and overseas locations in the email & support links in the phishing page and,
  • false urgency; a subject line such as ‘Action Required’ and a signature supposedly from 'Commonwealth Bank of Australia Fraud Security Support' creates a sense of panic and anxiety.

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Commonwealth Bank impersonated in phishing scam; email asks users to confirm card ‘activity’

The hallmark of this scam lies in its ability to trick users by ironically using a security alert. Verifying irregular transaction activity is a common trait of well-established banks like Commonwealth and it’s this focus on security that cybercriminals behind this scam leverage on. Here are some of the specific techniques they’ve incorporated to trick recipients:
Despite these techniques to fool users into thinking the email is authentic, eagle-eyed recipients will spot red flags that point to its illegitimacy, with the biggest being the fact that the link doesn't actually point to Commonwealth Bank. Besides this, the email also contains spacing errors and grammatical mistakes like ‘are all transactions listed above clear for you?’.
This is another reminder for those who utilise online banking, to pay close attention to the emails they receive from their banks. To best protect yourself, it is imperative that you do not click any link contained within an email, especially if it does not address you by name (as in the scam above). It is best practice to type the website URL into your browser or use the official banking app in this instance.
As banks have been a major target for scammers, they have also been working hard to distinguish their legitimate correspondence from the ‘fakes’ and educating their customers on best security practices. This is also why any legitimate correspondence from your bank won't have links to their website. Banks will instead ask you to manually enter it into your internet browser. Also, if you are ever unsure if it is your bank genuinely trying to reach you, simply contact them directly to confirm.

How to Stay Cyber Safe This Holiday Season


How to Stay Cyber Safe This Holiday Season

With the holiday season upon us, it is important to maintain awareness of the many threats posed by cyber-criminals this time of year As the popularity of online shopping continues to increase, so does the number of potential unsuspecting victims for cyber-criminals to exploit. Scammers may target victims through a variety of methods, including via emails, compromised websites, spoofed websites, phone calls, text messages, or unsecured Wi-Fi networks. To help combat the threats posed aby cyber-criminals this holiday season, review the following list of common scams, tips, and best practices:

Be Wary of Links and Attachments in Unsolicited Emails
Around the holidays, users may receive emails from known retailers regarding sales and coupons, or claiming to be order confirmations or shipping notices. Cyber-criminals can easily steal retailer branding to make fraudulent emails appear legitimate and may contain links or attachments that install malware or lead recipients to spoofed websites that steal user credentials. These emails may attempt to convey a sense of urgency - Limited Time Offer! - to prevent users from thoroughly inspecting the email for red flags. Users are advised to navigate directly to retail websites by typing the legitimate URL into their browser instead of clicking on links in emails, and refrain from entering login credentials on websites visited via a link in an email.

Avoid Pop-Up Advertisements and Shortened URLs
Users are encouraged to use pop-up blockers to avoid unintentionally clicking on a pop-up ad that could introduce malware onto their system. Additionally, URL shorteners can be employed to trick users into visiting a malicious website. URL shorteners are often used on social media sites and other outlets to save space and for visual appeal. Users are advised to use a URL expander to reveal the true destination of shortened URLs prior to visiting the site.

Look Out for Holiday-Themed eCards and Messages Meant to Install Malware
In the past, users reported being targeted with various Thanksgiving Day-related scams. In some cases, spoofed emails were sent appearing to originate from legitimate organizations and contained the subject line “Thanksgiving eCard.” Additionally, an Emotet banking trojan campaign was observed using Thanksgiving lures, such as the subject lines “Happy Thanksgiving Day Greeting Message” and “Thanksgiving Day Card.” As malicious actors commonly leverage public interest during the holiday season to conduct financial fraud and disseminate malware, users are reminded to exercise caution with unexpected or unsolicited emails, especially those with a holiday theme.

Do Your Online Shopping at Home
Avoid using public computers, such as those at a library or hotel, or public Wi-Fi connections to log into personal accounts or conduct online shopping. Public computers could be infected with malware designed to steal your information and hackers can intercept network traffic traveling over unencrypted Wi-Fi signals. If you must connect to public Wi-Fi, use a virtual private network(VPN), to secure information transmitted between your device and the internet. Additionally, users are advised to refrain from using work computers to make online purchases, as cyber threats could endanger company and/or customer information.

Enable Multi-Factor Authentication (MFA) on All Accounts
Be sure to enable MFA (authentication by combining at least two of the following: something you know, something you have, and something you are) on every account that offers it as this will greatly reduce the risk of account compromise via credential theft. Even if a cyber-criminal obtains a user’s username and password, they will be unable to access that user’s account without their second factor. We encourages users to choose authentication apps, hardware tokens, or biometrics as a second factor over SMS-based authentication, due to the risk of SIM-swapping. The website TwoFactorAuth.org maintains a comprehensive list of websites that offer MFA.

Choose Credit Over Debit
When shopping online or at stores that do not yet support chip-and-PIN payments, it is advised to use credit cards over debit cards. While both payment methods pose a risk if compromised, debit cards do not carry the same consumer protections as credit cards, which limit the victim’s liability if fraudulent purchases are made using their payment card data. Magecart attacks, in which malicious code is injected into online payment webpages, are becoming more prevalent as the opportunity to steal payment card data from physical point-of-sale terminals has diminished.

Avoid Connecting Devices to Public Charging Stations
Public charging stations supplied with power cables or USB ports located in stores, airports, libraries, and schools may seem like a convenient way to charge your mobile devices on-the-go, but can you be sure that your device and data will be safe if you connect? These kiosks can contain concealed computers that attempt to extract data such as contact information, photos, and videos from connected devices, unbeknownst to the users. Additionally, malicious or compromised charging stations can expose devices to the risk of a malware infection. Even if the charging station is not malicious, the manufacturer or owner of the kiosk may require users to input their email addresses or phone numbers in order to charge their devices, potentially exposing them to unwanted marketing campaigns, phishing emails, and scam calls.


Verify Charities Before Donating
It is common around the holidays to donate to charities, particularly those that provide goods and/or services to those individuals in need. Users may be prompted to donate via solicitations received through email or social media; however, these may be promoting fake charities or impersonating legitimate charities. Prior to donating, ensure you are visiting the charity’s legitimate website to donate.

Beware ‘Secret Sister’ Gift Exchange Scam
Many people enjoy participating in group gift exchanges this time of year, however, beware of potential scams. Social media posts promoting a “SECRET SISTER" gift exchange has resurfaced recently, promising between 6 and 36 gifts in exchange for sending one gift. While this type of chain-letter appears innocent, it is actually illegal and considered a pyramid scheme. The scam begins by requesting the name and address of the recipient and their friends. This holiday season only participates in gift exchanges with individuals you know personally and refrain from sharing too much personal information online.


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